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Home - Uncategorized - Type 2 Diabetes – Can Low Levels of Antibodies Contribute to the Development of Diabetes?

Type 2 Diabetes – Can Low Levels of Antibodies Contribute to the Development of Diabetes?

Posted on September 7, 2018 in Uncategorized

Scientists at Guandong Medical University and several other research institutions in China and Scotland found low levels of certain types of antibodies in people who had been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. These antibodies stop inflammation, which has a known link to insulin resistance, the cause of Type 2 diabetes.

In November of 2017, the Journal of Inflammation, (London), reported on a study that looked at antibodies to inflammatory molecules in people with Type 2 diabetes. Women had decreased levels of the antibodies called anti-IL6 IgG and anti-IL8 IgG. Both molecules are inflammatory, as is anti-TNF-ALPHA IgG, which was seen in low levels in men. The participants were then given blood sugar lowering drugs for 6 months. HbA1c levels were found to be…

  • lowest in those diabetics with the highest levels of anti-ILALPHA IgG and
  • highest in those with low levels of the antibodies,

although the differences were not statistically significant.

From this information the researchers concluded deficiencies of antibodies to inflammatory molecules probably raises the risk for the development of Type 2 diabetes.

Antibodies are proteins that attach themselves to molecules known as antigens. We usually think of antibodies as connecting themselves to alien organisms, such as bacteria and viruses to enable white blood cells to engulf and kill the invaders.

Inflammation is part of the immune response, but it must fade away after the invaders have been vanquished. The role of antibodies to inflammatory molecules is to stop inflammation.

Antibodies are also known as immunoglobulins, and they are composed of three protein chains held together in a Y shape. Five types of antibody are classified according to their species of chains. The chains include…

  • IgG,
  • IgM,
  • IgA,
  • IgE, and
  • IgD.

Inflammation is defined by the five conditions it causes…

  • heat,
  • redness,
  • pain,
  • loss of function, and
  • swelling.

Inflammation in the body is named for the inflamed organ plus the ending “itis.” For instance, inflammation of the skin is called dermatitis, “derma” for skin, and “itis” for inflammation.

Two main classes of drugs are used for fighting inflammation…

  • cortisone which resembles a body hormone, and
  • non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) include medications such as aspirin, Tylenol, and Motrin.

Cortisone is a steroid, which works against inflammatory reactions by blocking white blood cells from going to the site where the inflammation takes place. (Not to be confused with steroids used illegally to boost athletic performance).

NSAIDs work against body molecules called prostaglandins, which are also pro-inflammatory.